Chiopi bungalow

Chiopi bungalow

Chiopi was the first sorority at National Park Seminary. Actually, it was not intended to be a sorority, but started off as a secret literary society. In 1895, Charlotte Priest began meeting surreptitiously with a number of girls at unusual hours. The girls would sneak out of their rooms to a place they called the "Mouse Hole" (an alcove formed where the newly-constructed first Gymnasium met the Main building). Needless to say, these comings-and-goings raised some concern about what sort of clandestine behavior was going on. When she confronted Ms. Priest, Vesta Cassedy was relieved to find out that it was a literary society. Nevertheless, she only grudgingly gave permission for Chiopi to continue to meet. So that other students would not feel excluded, Mrs. Cassedy organized a second, more public, sorority and built the first clubhouse for that sorority (later called Alpha).

The Chiopi club room

Originally, the Chiopi clubhouse was an adaptation to the bungalow style, with slightly upturned edges of the roof giving it an Oriental flavor. Some sources refer to it as the Japanese bungalow. When the Chi Psi Upsilon Pagoda, which had a more pronounced and authentic Oriental style, went up right next door, suddenly the Chiopi house didn't look so Oriental anymore! The house was remodeled to give it a more conventional American bungalow look.
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This page was last maintained on 05/21/98.